TWENTY EIGHTH SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME



REFLECTION FROM THE DESK OF THE PASTOR

Today’s Gospel passage is  fitting on this occasion as we celebrate thanksgiving weekend. It teaches us about the striking lesson of gratitude. To explain this more, the evangelist depicted this striking event in the life of Jesus where ten lepers went to Him and asked for a healing. They are like customers asking Jesus for a healing service because they believe that Jesus could heal them for free without asking any doctor’s fee. Unlike today, you will not be treated or admitted in a hospital unless you deposit a certain amount. After healing Jesus tells them to go to a priest to see to it that they really are cured as commanded by the Jewish law. As for today, they have to go to the health workers of the department of health and ask for a medical certificate to prove that this person is really healed. However, among nine lepers only one returned to Jesus to give him thanks. It is not very difficult to say, “Thank you” to those people who have done good to us or helped us in our needs. Saying this would not only help ourselves ease of the burdens but also the people who heard it can help them forget for the meantime their own hardships too. It makes our hearts soften and make the burden of our works light.
Let us give thanks to the Lord for He is good. His love endures forever.

TWENTY SEVENTH SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME




REFLECTION FROM THE DESK OF THE PASTOR

Today’s Gospel passage talks about our attitude towards our faith and our active faith in God. What supposed to be are the attitudes of a Christian towards his/her faith in God? Does it mean going to Mass every Sunday? Does it mean praying or having statues of the Blessed Virgin Mary and other Saints in our house? Does it mean sharing one faith, one Baptism and one Lord? Yes, but more than these, a Christian should not be known only by his/her attitude towards his/her faith but most especially on how he/she acts upon this faith through loving.  Sometimes, it is easy to be faithful and loving to God and to others when everything is going well for us just as it is easy to be loving and kind to pleasant and nice people. But we make so many excuses and we don’t want to perform our responsibilities as believing Christians. We are challenged to do our duties as Christians and live with them by nurturing and developing the gift of faith. God says do your best and I will do the rest. Faith in God presupposes faith in ourselves.

TWENTY SIXTH SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME





REFLECTION FROM THE DESK OF THE PASTOR

Today’s Gospel tells us about the parable of the Rich man and Lazarus. Jesus does not teach us that owning wealth is bad, so we have to disregard it. God creates this wealth; therefore, this is good. But let us see to it that if we have plenty of wealth, it means God blesses us, no it is not that way. Rather God is just so merciful to us and to you. He trusts us, those who have plenty of wealth to help uplift the situation of the poor. There are billions of poor and needy around us and we are challenged to share and help them of what we have. Sometimes we become blind when one personal interest reigns. Let us not only help those who are materially poor but also those who are spiritually poor. As Mother Theresa said, “They don’t have food but love, they are homeless not because they don’t have homes but because they are rejected.”