TWENTY FIFTH SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME



REFLECTION FROM THE DESK OF THE PASTOR

Through the parable Jesus teaches us a lesson on what controls or rules our lives. Who is the master in charge of our lives? Our master is that which governs our through-life, shapes our ideas and controls the desire of the heart and the values we chose to live by. Many different things can rule us – the love of money or possessions, the power or position, the glamour of wealth and prestige, the driving force of unruly passions and addictions. Ultimately the choice boils down to two: God and “mammon”. What is mammon? Mammon stands for material wealth or possessions of whatever tends to “control our appetites and desires.” There is one master alone who has the power to set us free from the slavery of sin and addiction. The master is the Lord Jesus Christ.
In other words, we should not serve two masters but let us make God as the focus of our lives. We have a whole set of values in our life and there is a hierarchy in the choices we make. That is God before worldliness, spouse before others, family before work, happiness before pleasures, integrity before wealth and people before things. Let us be wise, trustworthy and a focused steward of God.

TWENTY FOURTH SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME




REFLECTION FROM THE DESK OF THE PASTOR

Today’s readings from the Holy Scriptures teach us about the overflowing mercy and forgiveness of God. The prodigal son comes to his senses. He repents. His repentance is superficial. He had what the church would call “imperfect contrition”. Imperfect contrition is when we are sorry for our sins because we fear the consequences, especially hell. Perfect contrition is when we are sorry for the best possible reason because we have offended our Heavenly Father whom we love above all things. But notice that his father still forgives. The church teaches that our Heavenly Father will do the same for us. He will forgive us of our serious sins if we go to confession with at least an imperfect contrition in our hearts. Once he is forgiven, the prodigal son is able to share once again in the family meal, for us that is symbolic of the Eucharist. This is why the church teaches us that if we have mortal sin we may not receive Communion again until we go to Confession and confess our sins.
Let us pray for those who have fallen away from the grace of God so that Divine mercy and forgiveness may reach out to them before it is too late. May their ears be opened so they will hear that Jesus is welcoming them back again.

TWENTY THIRD SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME



SEPTEMBER 6, FIRST FRIDAY OF THE MONTH.   
EUCHARISTIC ADORATION: 6.15 P.M - 
EXPOSITION OF THE BLESSED SACRAMENT FOR ADORATION.  
7 P.M - BENEDICTION. 
7.15 P.M - HOLY MASS. (Morning 8 am mass schedule remains as it is.) 

COME AND JOIN US WITH YOUR FAMILY, FRIENDS AND NEIGHBOURS. SPEND TIME BEFORE THE BLESSED SACRAMENT AND RECEIVE MANY, MANY BLESSINGS AND HEALING.  
---- Fr. Terry Dias


REFLECTION FROM THE DESK OF THE PASTOR

The phrase ‘No turning back”, used in our gospel has no negative meaning but it has a positive implication. We must have God more than others, even more than our parents, family, brothers and sisters. This is a very serious matter.
If we meet a conflict between our loved ones and Christ, what should be our priority, Our family or God? God is not in competition with our family, parents and sisters for our love. He states very clearly, however that God comes first in our lives, nobody and nothing that become His rival. Giving God the first place, on the other hand assures us that we practice true love to all people and give each person his rightful place. Jesus has often taught that our love for neighbor is the real test of our love for God. It is mainly in our caring and serving attitude to our neighbor that we cooperate with God’s plan. Our love for people can never be an excuse to surrender our love for God.